What Are the Penalties for Credit Card Fraud in NJ?

Contact Us
holding credit cards

Say that you are found to be using a credit card to wrongfully obtain money, goods, services, or anything valuable. Well sadly, this may mean that you may be accused of credit card fraud. With this, you must understand that even the slightest wrongful action may be considered a serious criminal offense with serious criminal consequences. Continue reading to learn the potential penalties for credit card fraud and how one of the experienced New Jersey & Pennsylvania criminal defense lawyers at The Vigilante Law Firm, P.C. can help ward them off.

What are common examples of credit card fraud?

Credit card fraud may constitute the wrongful obtaining of a credit or debit card. Or, it may constitute the wrongful use of a credit or debit card. Either way, you may be the subject of criminal court proceedings for fraud if you are accused of participating in any of the following acts:

  • You may have purposefully provided false information when applying for a credit card.
  • You may have purposefully added a magnetic strip or otherwise altered a credit card’s function.
  • You may have purposefully used another party’s credit card for purchases without their consent.
  • You may have purposefully stolen another party’s credit card information via Internet theft or hacking.
  • You may have purposefully used a copy of another party’s sales receipt to steal their credit card information.
  • You may have purposefully used an electronic device to steal another party’s credit card’s magnetic strip (i.e., skimming).

What are the potential penalties for credit card fraud in New Jersey?

Depending on exactly how you allegedly committed credit card fraud, you may be charged with a fourth-degree or third-degree criminal offense. For example, if you were found to be purposefully providing false information when applying for one credit card, you may be hit with a fourth-degree criminal offense. But if you were caught doing so for two to four different credit cards, you may be slammed with a third-degree offense. Without further ado, these offenses carry the potential for the following penalties:

  • Fourth-degree credit card fraud:
    • A jail sentence of up to 18 months.
    • A fine of up to $10,000.
  • Third-degree credit card fraud:
    • A prison sentence of three to five years.
    • A fine of up to $15,000.

This is not to mention that the New Jersey family court may also sentence you to pay restitution to the victim. This may be alongside court-ordered community service hours, and so on and so forth.

So, if you believe this is a complete misunderstanding or a case of mistaken identity, you must furiously fight back. With this, you must remember to hire one of the experienced New Jersey & Pennsylvania criminal defense lawyers. Our team at The Vigilante Law Firm, P.C. is looking forward to working with you.

Our Recent Blogs

Is Stalking a Crime in New Jersey?

By New Jersey law, stalking is defined as purposeful conduct that may make a reasonable person fear bodily injury or death to themselves or…

How Do Employers Hide Wrongful Termination?

New Jersey is an at-will employment state. This means that absent of an employment contract with a specific term, your employer may have the…

What Are Defense Tactics for Homicide Cases?

Under New Jersey statute, homicide may be classified as a crime like murder or manslaughter. That alone may just tell you how seriously you…

Website built and managed by Accel Marketing Solutions, Inc