What Are Defense Tactics for Homicide Cases?

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Under New Jersey statute, homicide may be classified as a crime like murder or manslaughter. That alone may just tell you how seriously you may be penalized with a homicide charge. This is why, from the jump, you must take any accusation against you seriously and do everything possible to prove your innocence. Continue reading to learn the possible defense tactics used for homicide cases and how one of the experienced New Jersey & Pennsylvania criminal defense lawyers at The Vigilante Law Firm, P.C. can help you build an effective legal strategy.

What is considered a homicide offense in the state of New Jersey?

Essentially, New Jersey law recognizes homicide as an act in which one person causes the death of another person. Of note, a homicide may result from accidental, reckless, or negligent acts and therefore may or may not be driven by an intent to cause harm to another person. With that being said, homicide may be charged as high as a first-degree crime. This may come with the penalty of 30 years to life in prison.

What are effective defense tactics for homicide cases?

You do not want to face the high penalties that come with a homicide charge, especially if you did not or did not intend to commit this act. Rest assured, there are three major defense tactics you may adopt to reduce or eliminate this charge: mistaken identity, self-defense, and challenging the prosecution’s evidence.

For one, when claiming mistaken identity, you must come up with an alibi. Basically, an alibi may demonstrate that you were elsewhere at the time the homicide was supposedly committed.

Then, when using the self-defense tactic, you must demonstrate that you had a valid reason to believe that the other party posed an imminent threat of harm. Therefore, you must argue that, if you did not fight back, you would have likely incurred severe physical injuries or experienced death.

Last but not least, you may poke holes in the prosecution’s presented evidence and question its validity or assumed interpretation. That is, you must argue that the prosecution has not brought forward sufficient proof to establish your guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

What evidence do I need to support my defenses?

Your necessary evidence may depend on the specific defense tactic you choose to pursue.

For example, you may need to collect oral or written witness testimonies and copies of surveillance camera footage to support your alibi. Or, you may need to share records of communication exchanges (i.e., emails, text messages, voicemails, etc). between you and the other party to prove that they had a motive to harm you. Lastly, you may need to seek a forensic expert who may attest to the prosecution’s lack of valid and admissible evidence.

All in all, there is no time like the present to start building your defense strategy. So, at your earliest possible convenience, please get in touch with one of the experienced New Jersey & Pennsylvania criminal defense lawyers from The Vigilante Law Firm, P.C.

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